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The Bull City Dignity Project


a new telling of Durham's stories 

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The Bull City Dignity Project


a new telling of Durham's stories 

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Show Info & Tickets

 

Tickets are on sale now for the Bull City Dignity Project!

The first two performances will be at the Hayti Heritage Center, starting at 6:30.

Buy tickets to the August 18th performance here!

Buy tickets to the August 19th performance here!

The third performance will be at The Durham Arts Council, beginning at 6:30.

Buy tickets to the August 20th performance here!

Tickets are available on a pay-what-you-want basis. All donations will go to a future production about Durham history by a group of the students.  

 

 

 

On August 18th, 19th and 20th, a group of eleven Durham high school students will put on the second annual Bull City Dignity Project, supported by Kenan Institute for Ethics, a documentary theater project based on the lives of Durham's community members. This year the students have focused their hard work on the developing the show's theme: The Body. From stories of health inequality in the "City of Medicine" to an exploration of policing and restorative justice, join us for an evening of story-sharing, community, and a celebration of the young voices in Durham!

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BCD BLOG: Co-Director, Lara Haft on Community landscapes

Kari picks me up from the airport after a visit with my family, and as we drive down Interstate 147, those words ring loudly in my ears. Highway as wound, pavement as scar tissue. In Bull City Dignity, we’ve been telling the story of I-147, a highway funded by referendum in the 1960’s and finally completed in the 90’s. 147 was built through Pettigrew St, straight through the heart of Durham’s Black business district, in the area known as Hayti.

Read our blog here. 

BCD BLOG: Co-Director, Kari BarcLay On "Difficultating"

Moving into the fourth week of rehearsal, Lara and I have gone back and forth about how best to facilitate the writing process. Good facilitation can be elusive; it dances somewhere in the middle between unilateral leadership and anarchic consensus. It also demands keeping one eye on the product and the other on the process. Navigating these many balancing acts during the rehearsal process, I think back to a theater class at Duke with Jeff Storer, who once told us, “a director’s job is to create community.”

Read our blog here.